Posts tagged police.

Almost every marginalized group that cites evidence of violence, especially police violence and abuse, is actually citing statistics against African-American members of that group.

girljanitor:

1. Police assault a gay man. It is reported and framed as an “anti-gay” attack. White gay people say “look at the terrible violence we face!”

He is a black man.

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2. Feminists decry the horrific new developments in regard to the criminalization of pregnancy, i.e. people with uteri who are prosecuted and/or sent to prison for refusing a c-section, having a miscarriage or stillbirth, having a mental illness, being perceived as “irresponsible”, et cetera.

White women: “this is happening to women!!!” News stories invariably show the pregnant bellies of white women. The stories are written by white women, and are addressed to white women. Which is also cissexist.

This is happening to Black and Native American women like Regina McKnight and Martha Greywind:

First, we describe characteristics of the women and the cases, finding that low-income women and women of color, especially African American women, are overrepresented among those who have been arrested or subjected to equivalent deprivations of liberty.

who are poor, and often living in the South, with its rich history of forced sterilizations and eugenics. South Carolina especially showed preference for sterilizing African American women.

From the report:

For example, in South Carolina thirty-four of ninety-three cases came from the contiguous counties of Charleston and Berkeley.

3. A white Autistic person writes the line, “Being mentally ill means that I am more likely to be shot by police”, and explains why hiding a mental illness can be a survival tool. 

Unfortunately, here in reality, those Autistic people who are shot to death by police can’t hide the immediate, visual fact that they are Black men.

Stephon Watts, 15

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Ernest Vassell, 57

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Stephen Eugene Washington, 27

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Roger Parker Jr., 9

Who was not killed, but was beaten by police and then arrested for aggravated assault to a police officer. [LINK INCLUDES IMAGE OF BATTERED CHILD]

4. The face of LGBT activism is white gay men writing about police violence toward white gay people. Pepper spray at a Pride Parade is big news. In fact, many articles defend a white gay man who assaulted a Black woman and told her to “go back to Africa”. White gay men love to write about how subject to violence they are.

The problem with that is, almost all of the violent crimes including murders are against gay people of color

and almost all of those (44 percent of overall) are against the “t” in LGBT

and nearly all of those crimes are against Trans* women of color

And those women are quite likely to be prosecuted, harassed, and/or arrested/assaulted by police when they are the VICTIMS of a violent crime.

Also, trans* women of color are sent to prison for surviving a vicious attack. After a trial in which evidence of the attacker’s racism, swastika tattoos, and criminal history is suppressed.

5. Disability advocacy organization in Washington decries disabled children being criminalized, arrested, and prosecuted for minor or nonexistent infractions. News sites report that Mississippi School-To-Prison Pipeline “targets African American AND disabled children”, and uses this image:

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When in fact, ALL of the children targeted were children of color:

all of them “children of color,” says Jody Owens, with the Southern Poverty Law Center–were routinely arrested at Meridian schools allegedly on the say-so of teachers or administrators, handcuffed and taken to jail where they were held for days on end without benefit of a hearing, a lawyer, or understanding their Miranda rights.

Meridian county is 55% African-American, and about 70% of schoolchildren are African American.

Disabled children of color face torture, imprisonment, vicious beatings perpetrated by teachers, and are African American children with or without disabilities are 3 1/2 times more likely to receive “disciplinary action” against them in school than white students.

6. There is a huge outcry against the NRA’s suggestion of armed guards at Elementary schools in the wake of the Sandy Hook school shooting.

A bare footnote or completely lost in this outcry is the fact that an overwhelming proportion of children of color, especially Black and Latino children, already go to schools with armed guards and police presence on the campus.

The notorious and unapologetic racist sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, Joe Arpaio, has sent out more than 3,000 untrained “posse” volunteers to “police” schools under his purview. This is when his “trained” deputies already torture, abuse, beat, and murder people of color in Maricopa County on a terrifyingly regular basis.

The problem is, if you are a Black student, the campus police may be quite likely to shoot you dead.

To come full circle, the student shot dead by police in the link above also had a mental illness.

Almost every marginalized group that cites evidence of overwhelming discrimination and violence, especially police violence and abuse, is actually citing statistics against African-American members of that group.

The point of all this is that journalism repeatedly fails to accurately report that people of color suffer the overwhelming majority of police violence. The racism built into the very foundations of American society and culture ensures that this violence continues, is under-reported, misrepresented as evidence of criminality, when it fact it is evidence of the criminalization of people of color, especially Black Americans.

If you are a white person, and you experience a particular axis of marginalization and want to give statistics on the violence you face as an oppressed person, especially in regards to police violence, you should consider checking whether these statistics accurately reflect the violence against white members of the marginalized group you belong to.

And also of note: police violence is the measure of which overtly sanctioned violence perpetrated by U.S. government and society is glaring gateway into overall violence and discrimination is perpetrated again people of color, especially Black Americans. It permeates the education system, the medical and mental health systems, the social security and welfare systems, the legal system, the higher education systems, the banking systems, the commercial and entrepreneurial systems, and every single institution.

Oh my god yes all of this. This is all shit that’s been in the back of my mind always, but thank you for putting it into words and facts so well & so clearly. This might be what we use next time I teach zine-making at school, because last time I had trouble doing basic media studies quickly & coherently.

The DEA and the New Haven police, plus several suburban police departments (thanks a fuckin ton, suburbs) raided my neighborhood a few weeks ago and indicted 105 people, mostly black men, and mostly on charges of conspiracy to distribute drugs. The suburb whose K-9 unit was in front of my house at 5a.m. has its own enormous heroin problem, my partner grew up in that area and has some fucked up stories, but I guess handling your own shit isn’t a priority when there’s black people in the city that aren’t locked up yet.

Everybody’s bail was huge. No one’s got that kind of money. Many of the people taken are dads, and now it’s Father’s Day and they still aren’t home. For everyone who wants their daddies around and is separated in this way, the prison system is punishing those kids (and punishing them for something their dads possibly conspired to do, good lord).

Feds Indict 105 In Tre Bloods Probe ›

nakedcrip:

firesandwords:

readnfight:

And if anyone wants to read about what’s going on in my neighborhood and what I’m starting to feel doomed about, here. I don’t like dogs to begin with, never have, but especially when a suburb with its own notorious drug problem (but it’s mostly white kids so we don’t talk about it) has sent a K-9 unit into my neighborhood and the dog is barking outside my window at 5 a.m. while people are being pulled out of bed and I don’t know who they’re going after or why.

The largest-ever federal criminal sweep in Connecticut history netted 35 more alleged crack-dealing New Haven gang members Tuesday, and at least one man was hauled out of bed in a case of mistaken identity.

The fast-paced day began with predawn busts in the Fair Haven and Dwight-Kensington neighborhoods as well as some suburban communities. It continued with dozens of assembly-line appearances in U.S. District Court on Church Street, featured a near-brawl on the courthouse steps, and concluded with the state’s top prosecutor joining federal and local police officials in declaring victory.

“This,” the prosecutor, U.S. Attorney David Fein, said at a 3 p.m press conference, “is the largest federal criminal case in state history.”

The operation is called “Operation Bloodline.” The federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) ran it along with New Haven’s cops. Police from Hamden, North Haven, Milford, Ansonia, North Branford, and Branford took part, too.

It began a little more than a year ago, targeting the group accused of dominating the New Haven crack trade and having a hand in much of the tit-for-tat deadly violence on the streets: the Dwight-Kensington-based Tre Bloods gang.

Building on intelligence gathered by New Haven cops and DEA agents, the investigators had a potent weapon in their arsenal: court-authorized wiretaps on 22 different telephones.

They gathered enough evidence to obtain 105 indictments on charges related to crack and powder cocaine dealing as well as marijuana and oxycodone peddling.

Last Thursday agents conducted a sweep that netted the 32 arrests. (Another 14 defendants were already in court on other charges.)

Most of those arrested were indicted on charges of taking part in a conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. They face minimum sentences of 10 years in jail, up to life; and up to $10 million in fines. Some face heroin and powder cocaine charges as well as possession with intent to sell narcotics and possession of illegal firearms.

“We put a big dent in the gang violence in this city,” New Haven Assistant Police Chief Archie Generoso declared Tuesday. “We’re going to continue doing that. We’re not going to stop here.”

One of my friends who has been stressing about this with me pointed something out: a combination of New Haven police plus several other towns, plus the DEA, got most of these indictments based mostly on wiretaps over the course of a year—but the best they were able to get on the majority of the people was conspiracy. How guilty am I supposed to think anybody is, if the most you can catch over a year of spying is conspiracy?

well put. the neighborhood is one of the last few spots in the city that is close to yale & downtown and is relatively affordable. pike international has been buying up lots and houses left and right and all of their ad’s refer to blocks around here that aren’t even that close to downtown as ‘minutes from yale’, ‘minutes from downtown/shopping districts’, ‘looking for young professionals’. the school of architecture just dropped an incredibly unfitting house down the street thats being advertised as such in yuppie cafe’s and shortly after the house was put on the market, the house next-door was foreclosed on.

it’s pretty clear that land-grabbing, in a city where yale owns 1/4 of the (most expensive land) yet pays no taxes on it is one of the many incentives to the raids happening in this part of town..

The first steps towards “gentrification” are made in combat boots.

This is a pattern that is only becoming solid for me now. I’ve been living in this neighborhood for 5 years now, in 3 different buildings, and they’ve each had some amount of cops running through the place. At the first apartment, it was in the aftermath of immigration raids in town; a year or so after I’d moved out, the building was sold and all the tenants, almost all immigrants, were evicted illegally so the building could be rehabbed and rented exclusively to Yale students.

In my mind the drug raids now and the immigration raids we had a few years ago are pretty similar and connected. So far the difference is that immigrant communities and Latino communities mobilized really strongly and really quickly, and the NHPD passed a general order to not collaborate with ICE. Black communities here are more fractured than that (especially since it was a raid on just one gang). I’d really like to see us step up against raids like this instead of accepting it as what happens—and I think some of us are working on making that happen.

No patience anymore for people who say gentrification isn’t a big deal. This shit is violent. I wasn’t ever skittish in my neighborhood before the way I have been since the raids.

(via 93459092358025-deactivated20140)

Feds Indict 105 In Tre Bloods Probe ›

And if anyone wants to read about what’s going on in my neighborhood and what I’m starting to feel doomed about, here. I don’t like dogs to begin with, never have, but especially when a suburb with its own notorious drug problem (but it’s mostly white kids so we don’t talk about it) has sent a K-9 unit into my neighborhood and the dog is barking outside my window at 5 a.m. while people are being pulled out of bed and I don’t know who they’re going after or why.

The largest-ever federal criminal sweep in Connecticut history netted 35 more alleged crack-dealing New Haven gang members Tuesday, and at least one man was hauled out of bed in a case of mistaken identity.

The fast-paced day began with predawn busts in the Fair Haven and Dwight-Kensington neighborhoods as well as some suburban communities. It continued with dozens of assembly-line appearances in U.S. District Court on Church Street, featured a near-brawl on the courthouse steps, and concluded with the state’s top prosecutor joining federal and local police officials in declaring victory.

“This,” the prosecutor, U.S. Attorney David Fein, said at a 3 p.m press conference, “is the largest federal criminal case in state history.”

The operation is called “Operation Bloodline.” The federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) ran it along with New Haven’s cops. Police from Hamden, North Haven, Milford, Ansonia, North Branford, and Branford took part, too.

It began a little more than a year ago, targeting the group accused of dominating the New Haven crack trade and having a hand in much of the tit-for-tat deadly violence on the streets: the Dwight-Kensington-based Tre Bloods gang.

Building on intelligence gathered by New Haven cops and DEA agents, the investigators had a potent weapon in their arsenal: court-authorized wiretaps on 22 different telephones.

They gathered enough evidence to obtain 105 indictments on charges related to crack and powder cocaine dealing as well as marijuana and oxycodone peddling.

Last Thursday agents conducted a sweep that netted the 32 arrests. (Another 14 defendants were already in court on other charges.)

Most of those arrested were indicted on charges of taking part in a conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. They face minimum sentences of 10 years in jail, up to life; and up to $10 million in fines. Some face heroin and powder cocaine charges as well as possession with intent to sell narcotics and possession of illegal firearms.

“We put a big dent in the gang violence in this city,” New Haven Assistant Police Chief Archie Generoso declared Tuesday. “We’re going to continue doing that. We’re not going to stop here.”

One of my friends who has been stressing about this with me pointed something out: a combination of New Haven police plus several other towns, plus the DEA, got most of these indictments based mostly on wiretaps over the course of a year—but the best they were able to get on the majority of the people was conspiracy. How guilty am I supposed to think anybody is, if the most you can catch over a year of spying is conspiracy?

We don't often talk about how black women and girls are criminalized and subjected to the criminal justice system, the prison industrial complex, and the violation of their bodies and personal space. ›

strugglingtobeheard:

lovewashername:

nor is there discussion about how this is a growing happening in other countries like Canada, where I’m at.

The only stats you find are about white girls and white women. Only research you find has very little to do with black women and girls interaction with the criminal justice system, legislation and penalties. The connections and intersections to be made and spoken of are missing like i don’t even know what.

i hope to do more research on this focusing on Black women because we are the top growing group of people being incarcerated at an increasing rate. and as someone who has experienced this shitty system, it is very personal for me.

Resistance Behind Bars by Victoria Law is on my summer reading list, and I’m reading Assata currently.

WTF is up with white people trying to disavow themselves of Zimmerman?

poemsofthedead:

Talking some shit about “he isn’t white, he’s hispanic”

Well, first of all, cracker, “Hispanic” is white.

Second, he identifies as white. He lives, breathes, acts as a white person ensconced in whiteness. And he upholds whiteness.

The bitch is white, whether you like it or not.

But now is so not the time for you to try to take the attention off of whiteness or to try to start some shit between Latino people and Black people.

I see you all with your complete lack of basic human decency.

Real talk: Black cops are still part of an anti-Black system. Would I rather have a few token POC in the police department than an all-white police force? Sure, but only so much as I might choose being beaten to death versus being stabbed to death—neither is a real choice, and neither involves my life and my agency.

People are on some ultra-simple shit if they think it’s impossible for POC to inflict racism upon each other and ourselves (even if dude identified as such).

(via bad-dominicana)

I have been teaching myself basic typography. It is so exciting, srsly. I redesigned the Copwatch New Haven know your rights posters that I made a long time ago, because now that I know better I know they were fugly.

Full text of the posters is at the old link, although I changed it slightly since then. As before, feel free to use the posters in any way you need to. It’s mostly split from a (even fuglier) Crimethinc poster and edited from there. Contact me if you need better resolution pdfs.

socialrupture:

Police cars attacked and banner dropped in memory of Shelley Hilliard — Chicago, IL

The communique:

“In the wee hours of the morning of November 13th, a banner was dropped on a bridge over the I-90/94 in Chicago reading, “Don’t Mourn, Attack! Avenge Shelley!” and three police vehicles were disabled in response to the brutal murder of a young trans woman named Shelley “Treasure” Hilliard, whose torso was found next to the same highway (I-94) in Detroit this past week.

It is easy to become lost in the sorrow of the brutal violence of gender that exposes the bodies of trans women to a one-in-twelve chance of violent death at the hands of the partisans defending this wretched society. But our violence is the alchemy that can turn our tears into a potent poison dripping down the throat of the social order. Take action to avenge Shelley’s death and to remind us all that in the face of the terror of prisons, police, and queer-bashing, that it is our obligation to bash back against all that would destroy us. We look forward to hearing about more attacks for Shelley and for us all in the coming weeks.

Solidarity to all the trans women and gender rebels surviving and rebelling in the belly of the prison and under the guns of the pigs!

Solidarity to our all comrades in the US, Mexico, Greece, Chile, and many other places who has chosen to attack and now face the violence of the law!

Solidarity with those whose survivals have been made criminal who are reclaiming their ability to struggle!”

http://chicago.indymedia.org/newswire/display/95347/index.php

(via notyrcisterpress)

In New Haven, “Occupiers” Embrace The Cops ›

firesandwords:

Paul Bass Photo

PAUL BASS PHOTO

OCCUPYNEWHAVEN making it clear whose side they’re on. They’ve done more outreach to the swine than any other community in New Haven. kolonial new england flags, “we’re all people of color”,  ”people of color need to get off the couch and come to this meeting”, countless other bs and now this. F that hippy fest.

Is this worth my time?

So, the local online newspaper ran this story about Occupy New Haven’s easygoing relationship with the police. I understand not wanting to have direct confrontations with the police, or maybe not even seeing the police as a collective enemy (I’ve heard many white people are capable of this); I might not choose that route, but I get it. But chanting “NHPD: you are family”? And making this many statements to media about how much they love and support police? I don’t see anyone making a public statement about how much they love and support, say, immigrants, or black kids with arrest records.

On the one hand, I want to point out (once again) that this whole thing is not very inviting for people of color, especially given all the police brutality survivors here and all the homeless people already living in this same park (who now have cops around; at least one person has told me he’s now unsafe in that park). But on the other hand: who cares? Are they really interested in having a strong POC presence and listening to and centering people of color? All I’ve seen on that front has been resistance and ignorance. Are people of color interested in getting involved? Are my students interested in getting involved? Not sure. Not too many that I know, although I know people taking them up on their offers of extra tents. I have some students willing to give teach-ins about being youth of color in New Haven. Other than that, I’m not even sure we’re interested in each other.

Is it worth my time to point out the problematic role of the cops in communities of color, and how this is alienating, when I’ve already done this? The only difference now is that there is clear support of the cops being made in the media?

Double standards

In years past, people have frozen to death in this very park:

[Name of police officer] from the NHPD just stopped by to visit #occupynewhaven. He was extremely nice and told us that the NHPD is collecting jackets for the occupiers and they have one officer stationed on the corner of the green to protect us. New Haven PD is being 110% excellent. D. said the NHPD is behind us and in total support. We thank them for their awesomeness.

Someone put this on the Occupy New Haven facebook. I mean, that’s cool that cops are donating jackets, but where were they every single other year that people were living on the Green? Where were they when people lived there not by choice?

The cop stationed on the corner was at the same corner where we do Food Not Bombs. We didn’t get to set up in the spot we wanted because it wasn’t really cool to be doing it right in front of a cop car. While I was hanging out on a bench talking to people, a homeless buddy of mine wanted to go use a port-o-potty (donated to the “occupation” by the city’s Parks & Rec) but then held it because he gets harassed by cops so much, and the cop car was right near the toilet.

A few different people who spend time on the Green also came by FNB laughing about what the police response would be if they tried to set up tents and camp out there, since as it is they get arrested just for sleeping on a bench. I was mad about the double standard, but for the most part they were used to it and just laughed it off. I asked around about if campers were at least sharing tents, and everyone said yes, so that’s good.

So, who are the cops protecting, and from whom? Cops beat people up, mace people, kick them, in that same park all the time. If the cops are going to donate coats and let people sleep in tents temporarily, that’s fine; I’m not trying to knock that or get in the way of it. But expecting to be able to form an alliance with the police is something that many, many people simply can’t do, and having cops around as protection is not going to create a welcoming environment for many people or allow space for addressing the role of police in oppressing certain members of the “99%.”

What is penality, and how is penal abolition different from prison abolition?

Penality goes beyond just prisons. It includes the court system, the culture upon which the court system relies, the idea that you can take time from somebody, that you can negotiate someone’s time, and policing. It’s one thing to oppose prisons and talk about what happens inside prisons and jails. That’s prison abolition, and anti-caging mentality, and it’s very important. But the penal-abolition movement looks at how slavery, Jim Crow, and prisons tag team each other. We don’t want to just abolish an institution; we’re not just trying to reform the law but to challenge the larger idea of legality itself, meaning the state’s ability to control its citizens in the name of punishment and law.

Viviane Saleh-Hanna interviewed in make/shift issue 9

In the UK, since 1998 there have been 333 deaths in police custody and not one officer convicted.

torayot:

iamwhoiamandidontgiveadamn:

sugaredvenom:

cheesethatiscake:

I’m sorry. But at this point there is no reason behind the riots. It’s a mob mentality and it is ignorance at an incredibly sad level.

You want to fight your government… Do so. But don’t destroy innocent peoples lives in the process. The ideals you think you are raging against are lost because of the piss poor tactics being used: violence and mayhem just for the sake of violence and mayhem.

I really like how you used those stats as a springboard to add nothing of relevance to a conversation about police racism and brutality.

No-one’s saying the violence against other people is jsutified for FUCKS SAKE, all we’re saying is there’s a political, social and economic backdrop to this that can’t be ignored.

So stop rushing to feel smug about how you’ve told everyone how bad you think it is at every fucking opportunity.

Okay so wait, is the headline and the first entry…is that like someone posted the fact and then the person up there responded?  or is that the non sequitor of non sequitors?  What the hell?

Anyways, all about sugaredvenom’s response right there.

Sibz is being awesome again.

Also, I don’t buy the idea that all of the groups of youths involved are one cohesive movement despite the mainstream media’s attempt to paint them all as one threatening monolith. They are not merely a horde of creatures who cannot understand human decency - it is absolutely loaded to describe them in comparison to animals. I imagine that, for at least some of them, the people involved are simply doing what makes sense. And unless you’ve been in their marginalised position, you cannot possibly understand why rioting would make sense. This doesn’t mean that what they’re doing is absolutely right, or that their position purchases them indemnity. It does mean, however, that we have to understand the context and actually listen to communities, because people obviously don’t suddenly go around destroying things if they’re busy having fulfilling lives.

You don’t give people less than the bare minimum, ignore their complaints when they try to play by your rules, shun them for not being acceptable, and then be surprised when there’s backlash.

There are “friends” on my Facebook page who are joining groups named ‘Not rioting because you have more than 1 GCSE’ or ‘Looting your gyal a weave cos you think she’s da one’. I see retweets of a quote by a Waterstone’s employee saying that the book shop will stay open so that the rioting youths will hopefully learn something. Apparently, being poor and/or black and being given sub-par life opportunities and education is just so funny! /sarcasm

And then you get still others saying that any of these people absolutely can’t be as poor and oppressed as they think they are because they have smartphones and wear expensive trainers which cost hundreds of pounds. Actually, you can get Blackberries for free if you pay something like a £20-30/month mobile phone tariff, so people aren’t dropping hundreds at once. The conspicious consumption of expensive trainers and up-to-date smartphones is anyway due to capitalism and consumerist culture. And they’re just nice things. I mean, do poor people not deserve nice things? Does it make them “dishonest” poor people who do not fulfil the Tiny Tim fantasy that privileged people like to indulge in? Hmmm.

So there’s an acknowledgement that the people involved in the riots are marginalised and have limited opportunities and resources… and that this is funny. This somehow co-exists with the denial that the people’s lives are actually that bad because they have the temerity to have nice things.

People need to understand that class is more than about possessing status goods: being middle class also comes with a sense of self-satisfaction, having connections, speaking the “right” way, expecting certain things from life and so on. Just because someone has a fairly fancy phone doesn’t mean that they can actually afford food at the end of the month, or that they can have the education/job/future they want, or even that they’ll be respected if they open their mouths to speak their minds.

British people are fed the myth that anyone can make it. So you go to your shitty state school and somehow make sense of an irrelevant and unengaging curriculum. You get your handful of A* - C GCSEs and go onto a better sixthform or further education college. You do your A-levels, get into university with your 360 points, try to make sense of an educational content and style that’s meant for better-off people used to more rigorous and encouraging schooling, and then graduate with your 2:1. You get a good graduate job with a good graduate salary. Congratulations, young parvenu, you’ve made it! And if you’ve made it, anyone can, right?

No. They can’t. And they shouldn’t be shamed for that. Despite the fact that I have essentially outlined my life story in that paragraph there (save actually getting a job), I resent that there ought to be any prescribed path to respectability, or that middle-class “respectability” should be on the cards at all. But the unfortunate fact is that you’re more likely to be listened to if you are the “good” working-class kind who want to “better” and “lift” yourselves. Ugh. My parents had internalised this racism and classism, and have always been eager for me to differentiate between us and those poor brown people. I went to school with people who grew up on estates and were gang members, and where there were police officers outside the school at hometime. I thought I knew the difference between us and them. I looked down on them, not knowing the damage I was doing. Once upon a time, my opinions would have matched the classist and/or racist shoutings and roaring going on in my Facebook and Twitter feeds.

The riots probably fulfilled some atavistic white and/or middle-class fantasy where the unwashed dark masses rise up and desecrate everything — without acknowledging their own contribution to the marginalisation of those communities. These attitudes help no-one and there needs to be change.

Bolding is mine.

The set-up was generic when it comes to these kinds of events. Police in a panel claiming that they want to initiate a dialogue with the community. Amongst them were leaders and “representatives” of the native community acting as mediators or, as it turned out, rather overseers for master. Seeing the Native representatives and leaders on the panel with the cops reminded me of all the books I had read as a kid about the history of Native peoples: treaties made, then broken. Some of them seemed to whole-heartedly believe they were helping their people. The police talked of making changes. I knew these were hollow promises. The only thing that comes from peace talks with the state is betrayal. On the panel were native police officers, which came as no surprise. An image of diversity is central to rainbow coalition politics. What seems to really matter is that people of color have the opportunity to be oppressors too. The rainbow coalition came to the forefront in two ways; the broker and the warden roles.

How can we advance the anti-police brutality struggle? (via janedoe225)

The cops in my city are starting this same kind of “dialoguing” right now, where they want to do racist shit 30 days of the month, then spend one day inviting us to talk about it with them.

#police